Remington 700 vs Ruger American: Which is Better?

Remington and Ruger are two brands that are synonymous with the hunting and firearm industry. There is not a hunter out there that hasn’t either shot a rifle from one of these brands or at least met a hunting dog named Ruger or Remington.

The best way to compare these iconic brands is by pitching two of their popular rifle models against each other, the Remington 700 and the Ruger American.

The Remington 700 & Ruger American Series

There is no shortage of rifle options between the Remington 700 and Ruger American series with all rifles coming in various calibers.

Remington’s reputation is built on the fact that they have been around for so long, boasting more Model 700s have been sold than any other bolt-action rifle. Remington prides themselves on their out-of-the-box accuracy and many Model 700 owners would attest to that.

Listed below are the rifle options within the Model 700 range and the calibers they are chambered in:

Model 700 SPS Tactical AAC-SD

  • .308 Win
  • 6.5 Creedmoor

Model 700 SPS Tactical

  • .308 Win
  • .300 AAC Blk

Model 700 SPS Stainless

  • .223 Remington
  • .243 Win
  • .270 Win
  • 7mm-08 Remington
  • 7mm Rem Mag
  • .30-06 Springfield
  • .300 Win Mag
  • .308 Win

Model 700 SPS

  • .243 Win
  • .270 Win
  • 7mm-08 Remington
  • 7mm Remington Mag
  • .30-06 Springfield
  • .300 Win Mag
  • .308 Win
  • 6.5 Creedmoor

Model 700 CDL SF

  • .270 Win
  • 7mm Remington Mag
  • .30-06 Springfield

Model 700 CDL

  • .243 Win
  • .25-06 Remington
  • .270 Win
  • 7mm Remington Mag
  • .30-06 Springfield
  • .300 Win Mag

Model 700 BDL

  • .243 Win
  • .270 Win
  • .30-06 Springfield
  • 7mm Remington Mag

Where Remington has more of a “if it’s not broken don’t fix it” attitude, Ruger tends to focus on innovation and smart custom features within their rifles.

Reliability, versatility, performance, and affordability are certainly accurate descriptions for Ruger’s American line of rifles.

Standard

  • .30-06 Springfield
  • .270 Win
  • .308 Win
  • .243 Win
  • 7mm-08 Rem
  • 6.5 Creedmoor

Predator

  • .22-250 Rem
  • 6.5 Creedmoor
  • .308 Win
  • .243 Win
  • .223 Rem
  • .204 Ruger
  • .350 Legend

Ranch

  • .350 Legend
  • .450 Bushmaster
  • 7.62×39, 5.56 NATO
  • .300 BLK
  • 6.5 Grendel

With Go Wild Camo

  • 7mm-08 Rem
  • .243 Win
  • 6.5 Creedmoor
  • .308 Win
  • .30-06 Springfield
  • .450 Bushmaster
  • .300 Win Mag
  • .350 Legend
  • .25-06 Rem

Hunter

  • 6.5 Creedmoor
  • .308 Win

Compact

  • .308 Win
  • .243 Win
  • 7mm-08 Rem
  • 6.5 Creedmoor

Rifle Design

The style and design of the Remington Model 700 range have a classic and almost simple look about them. A standard bolt placement with an elegant well-crafted stock fitted nicely below a 24” barrel.

The Model 700 CDL with its sleek, satin-finished walnut stock is the epitome of what every hunter thinks about when asked to imagine a rifle.

As mentioned earlier, Remington is the classic case of just allowing a good quality product to age well and have it rest on its past performances without tinkering with it too much and I would say many hunters are ok with that.

One only has to read the slogan on the Remington website under the description for the Model 700 BDL, where it proudly states, “A true classic, and not going anywhere anytime soon.”

Suppose one could argue that Remington did attempt to revive the old workhorse with the Model 700 SPS (Special Purpose Synthetic) Stainless rifle, but I am not so sure about that.

True it does have an improved ergonomically designed stock and a bead blasted 416 stainless steel barrel, but that’s kind of where the “re-designing” ends, and let’s be honest just because you put a new pair of shoes on an old racehorse doesn’t mean it is going to run faster.

Think of the Remington Model 700s like a poster of a 1966 Ford Fairline that as a kid you would pin up on your bedroom wall.

Looking at it each day hoping to own one when you grew up because every adult you knew had one and they were dotted all over town.

Now imagine slapping a poster of a 1974 Lamborghini Countach right next to the Ford, it would almost look alien, something out of this world. The Ruger series has that type of effect over the Remington.

Just by glazing over the Ruger American rifle range, one can see rifles of all shapes, sizes, designs, external features, and stock variations.

If the Remington Model 700 CDL were the Ford Fairline, then the Ruger American Hunter rifle would certainly be the Ferrari Countach.

With fully adjustable length of pull, comb height adjuster, enhanced ergonomic stock design, Picatinny rail, and hybrid muzzle break, it’s almost the complete opposite to the Model 700 CDL.

Pricing

Both manufacturers market their rifles as reasonably priced, accurate, and high quality.

Prices range from $650.00 up to $1,300.00 for the Remington, while the Ruger American rifles come in with a tighter range of $579.00 up to the Ruger American Rifle Hunter which will set you back $989.00 MSRP.

Given the solid reputation and popularity of these rifle brands, I would say those price ranges are reasonable.

Unique Features

Remington 700 vs Ruger American

Remington really pushes home the fact that their rifles are deadly accurate straight out-of-the-box and there is no point in disputing that, as they really are ready to work.

There are a few special features within the Model 700 range that help to cement their good reputation

The X-Mark Pro adjustable trigger for improved shooter performance and customization
A Hogue Overmolded pillar-bedded stock on the Model 700 SPS Tactical makes for a great finish.

The infamous “3 Rings of Steel” design means that the cartridge head while chambered is fully supported by three separate components.

The Model 700 CDL SF has a very well-designed cylindrical receiver which provides a solid bedding in the stock allowing for consistent shot placement

Ruger’s American rifles are jam-packed with unique features and to highlight every one of them would need to be a stand-alone article.

Below are a few hand-picked features that really are unique and should appeal to any hunter considering a Ruger American rifle

Ruger’s Marksman Adjustable trigger allows the hunter to adjust the pull weight between 3 to 5 pounds

The one-piece, three-lug bolt with a 70° throw and dual cocking cams makes for easy cycling of a round from the shoulder.

Ruger’s Patented Power Bedding integral bedding block system locates the receiver and free-floats the barrel which improves shooting accuracy.

The Hunter rifle has a Magpul short-action stock with fully adjustable length of pull and comb height
Staying with the Hunter rifle it also features a Magpul PMAG5 7.62 AC magazine that makes for quick and reliable detachment

Accuracy

Design, pricing, and special features are all important factors to consider when purchasing a hunting rifle, but they do not mean much if it can’t perform.

Credit needs to be given to Ruger and Remington as they have both focused on producing rifles that are deadly accurate.

One only has to read over the almost endless supply of rifle reviews on the Model 700 and American range of rifles to see just how accurate they are.

Couple any of the rifles with quality ammunition and I doubt there isn’t a hunter out there that wouldn’t be successful this hunting season, and if they aren’t then it certainly won’t be to the rifle’s fault.

Conclusion

The Remington Model 700 vs the Ruger American rifles is a fascinating story because it is effectively two American legends that took different paths yet ended up at the same destination.

With a variety in rifle types and a broad choice of calibers, there is a rifle within the Remington Model 700 or the Ruger American that will suit today’s modern hunter.

I happen to be an old soul in a young body and if I had to choose, then the classic Remington Model 700 would be my choice.

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